The pursuit of ‘frictionless authentication’ leaves corporate networks vulnerable to cyber attack

Posted: May 21st 2015

New whitepaper exposes the ‘culture of convenience’ forcing IT departments to overlook essential security measures

Swivel Secure is today launching its latest whitepaper, Network security and convenience: ‘Why the pursuit of frictionless authentication is a compromise too far’. The paper – the third in a series focusing on digital authentication security – outlines how the corporate IT department has allowed (or been forced to permit) a dangerous ‘culture of convenience’ to permeate through its systems at the expense of data security.

Chris Russell, CTO, Swivel Secure comments: “At present, too many businesses are allowing convenient access to corporate and consumer applications such as Gmail, Twitter or Dropbox and ignoring calls from IT teams to implement ‘risk assessments’. If this trend continues, we’ll see more and more high-profile data breaches and customers will soon begin to lose faith in these organisations.”

To help businesses understand the dangers of ‘frictionless authentication’ this paper:

  • Highlights how a corporate fixation with providing a ‘frictionless’ user experience is dangerously exposing corporate networks to criminal forces
  • Reimagines and realigns the relationship between user authentication, security, convenience and the user experience
  • Examines the weaknesses in the methods used to guard the gateways to corporate data
  • Explains why a strong alpha-numeric password is no more secure than one that is considered weak
  • Offers advice to businesses on risk-based and adaptive authentication techniques that can quickly and cost effectively reduce their risk of exposure.

This paper will be of value to IT professionals, senior executives and business owners interested in the relationship between user authentication, security and user experience, and how risk-based and adaptive authentication techniques can quickly and cost effectively reduce their risk of exposure.